Talking and listening helps to prevent youth suicide

Just by talking and listening, a friend or acquaintance can help a young person see that no problem is worth taking your own life.

Just by talking and listening, a friend or acquaintance can help a young person see that suicide is not the best choice for dealing with a seemingly insurmountable problem.

A little yellow card distributed by the Williams Lake Suicide and Sudden Death team is a quick reference for recognizing signs of suicide and knowing actions to take.

Warning

signs

• Talks or jokes about wanting to die.

• Deliberately injures him/herself.

• Appears depressed and withdrawn.

• Threatens suicide.

• Shows changes in behaviour, appearance or mood.

• Abuses drugs and alcohol.

• Makes final arrangements such as giving away prized possessions.

• Takes risks.

• There has been a previous attempt.

• Sudden happiness after a prolonged depression (may mean that the person has made a decision to commit suicide).

You can help

stay calm

and listen

Ask: Are you suicidal? — yes, take action; no, support and listen.

Will you make me a promise you won’t do anything until you talk to someone you trust? — Yes — who would you be comfortable talking to? — No: phone the Crisis Line 1-888-353-2273.

Support, listen and tell someone — don’t keep it a secret.

Remember these ABC’s

Act now! (do not wait).

Be supportive and listen.

Call for help — stay with your friend.

The little brochure can easily be tucked into a wallet and also give numbers for emergency responders Crisis Line 1-888-353-2273; Ambulance, 250-392-5402, toll free 1-800-461-9911; Hospital 250-392-4411, Gateway, 250-302-3261, or 1-855-302-3261.