Casey Bennett photo                                The Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin’s new storage shed being delivered and installed earlier this year.

Casey Bennett photo The Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin’s new storage shed being delivered and installed earlier this year.

New museum staff undertakes new cataloguing project

The Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin has had an incredibly exciting and busy year ahead

Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin

Special to the Tribune

The Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin has had an incredibly exciting and busy year with new events, exhibits and staff changes and has been getting more comfortable in their new location within the Tourism Discovery Centre (TDC).

With the lower level renovations completed in May, the museum now has multiple new exhibits in its sizable display area, with staff and volunteers working hard to continue to develop the exhibits to make the best use of the new spaces. This includes a new group of exhibits focusing on historic, local businesses, such as the Woodland Jewellers display which was completed with the help and consultation of Cindy Watt and Brenda and Kevin Bourdon.

The museum welcomed new manager Alex Geris to the museum staff in June of this year. Geris and her husband recently moved to Williams Lake from Ontario to start a new life in the Cariboo Chilcotin. Geris brings a background in archival studies and has enthusiastically moved into the position to manage the museum’s collection and operations.

“Emphasizing community through new events and focussing on developing collaborative partnerships with other organizations and groups is so important for a regional museum like this one. I’m really looking forward to the community building that we are actively working toward,” Geris said.

Davana Mahon has also joined the museum’s core team as their marketing and promotions co-ordinator and is working on actively increasing the museum’s online presence. She is also working on developing new activities to promote the museum and the cultural heritage the museum represents.

“It’s an exciting time for me to join the team at the museum, we have lots of upcoming events and plans for the future to encourage local visitors to remember we’re still here for them, and not just for tourists in the visitors’ centre,” Mahon said.

This summer also saw the beginning of the museum’s Red Cross Project which will continue on until September of 2020. The museum’s 2017 move from its downtown location to the TDC presented many new challenges as it was on a short timeline and then interrupted by the wildfires and the city’s subsequent evacuation.

Read More: Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin completes renos at TDC, looks forward to future

As a result, the museum’s collection requires significant work to improve the catalogue records and many of the larger objects had been stored off-site due to the limited space at the TDC. The goal of this project is to bring museum artifacts that are currently located off-site into the museum’s on-site storage while improving the collection records and completing the preservation of artifacts.

Under Red Cross funding, the museum has hired two full-time project assistants to complete this project: Casey Bennett and Nadia Erasmus. So far, the museum has successfully emptied two of its off-site storage locations with items relocated to the museum property at the TDC. Thank to this funding, the museum was also able to have a new storage shed built on TDC property that has helped provide storage for display supplies to create more artifact storage space inside the museum.

With the Red Cross project well underway, the entire collection will soon be physically accessible on-site and digitally catalogued, which will help make the best use of the museum’s vast collection of local heritage.

“We want to continue to create new displays to draw our community back into the museum and learn about their history, and with the improved records we’re going to be able to access and present these artifacts and their stories much more easily,” Geris said.

The museum is also beginning preliminary work on an exhibit that will focus on the forest fires of 2017 and its impact on the community as part of its Red Cross project. It will be partnering with the local forestry community to work on this exhibit, which will be completed in the Spring of 2020.

The museum is also readying itself for a busy winter ahead with several events coming up including their annual general meeting, Cariboo Country Christmas Craft and Trade Fair, Wreath Workshop, Christmas Tea and Bake Sale and our Sleighbells and Silverspurs Concert and New Years Celebration.

The museum’s AGM is coming up Thursday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. at city hall followed by the Cariboo Country Christmas Craft and Trade Fair on Saturday, Nov. 23. The craft fair will be held at the Elks Hall with doors opening at 10:30 a.m. and closing at 4 p.m. There will be a large variety of vendors, entertainment, food, Santa photos available by donation, and wagon rides.

Wagon rides will begin at 11 a.m. and run until 4 p.m. starting at the Cariboo Country Christmas Craft and Trade Fair at the Elks Hall and will travel through town with stops at the Seniors Activity Centre, Medieval Market, Cariboo Bethel Church, Cataline Craft Fair, and the Williams Lake Seniors Village.

At the end of November, the museum is holding its first Wreath Workshop, with only a couple spots left available. Call the museum at 250-392-7404 to book a spot. The Wreath Workshop is being held Saturday, Nov. 30 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the museum and will cost $30.

Read More: Joe Borsato leaves the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin

In December the museum will be hosting two more events, starting with the annual Christmas Tea and Bake sale on Sunday, Dec. 8 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Seniors Activity Centre. The museum invites the lakecity to avoid the stress of doing Christmas baking and to get all of your baking needs at the Christmas Tea and Bake Sale.

To wrap up 2019 the museum is hosting their first Sleighbells and Silverspurs Concert and New Years Celebration. There will be a live concert by Tennessee Walker, from Kamloops, door prizes, as well as appetizers throughout the night and complimentary champagne at midnight to ring in the new year. The door prizes include a $4,000 travel voucher.

Tickets for this 19-plus event are on sale for $50 each available at Margetts Meats, All-Ways Travel and at the museum.

The museum would like to extend a warm thank you to the community, museum members and volunteers, and sponsors for its continued support.

– Submitted by the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin.



patrick.davies@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Nadia Erasmus smiles widely as she and her fellow project assistant Caset Bennett works on cataloguing the entire collection the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin possesses, an initiative funded by the Red Cross. Patrick Davies photo.

Nadia Erasmus smiles widely as she and her fellow project assistant Caset Bennett works on cataloguing the entire collection the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin possesses, an initiative funded by the Red Cross. Patrick Davies photo.

Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin project assistants Nadia Erasmus (from left) and Casey Bennett are just two members of the team overseen by Museum Manager Alex Geris and marketing and promotions coordinator Davana Mahon. Here they stand in the newly renovated basement of the Tourism Discovery Centre which houses all the museum has to offer. Patrick Davies photo.

Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin project assistants Nadia Erasmus (from left) and Casey Bennett are just two members of the team overseen by Museum Manager Alex Geris and marketing and promotions coordinator Davana Mahon. Here they stand in the newly renovated basement of the Tourism Discovery Centre which houses all the museum has to offer. Patrick Davies photo.

Patrick Davies photo                                Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin project assistants Nadia Erasmus (from left) and Casey Bennett are just two members of the team overseen by Museum Manager Alex Geris and marketing and promotions coordinator Davana Mahon. Here they stand in the newly renovated basement of the Tourism Discovery Centre which houses all the museum has to offer.

Patrick Davies photo Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin project assistants Nadia Erasmus (from left) and Casey Bennett are just two members of the team overseen by Museum Manager Alex Geris and marketing and promotions coordinator Davana Mahon. Here they stand in the newly renovated basement of the Tourism Discovery Centre which houses all the museum has to offer.

One of the new displays at the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin is the original workbench and tools of the founder of Woodland Jewellers, Tony Woodland. Patrick Davies photo.

One of the new displays at the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin is the original workbench and tools of the founder of Woodland Jewellers, Tony Woodland. Patrick Davies photo.

Display cases now shine under the new lights installed during the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin’s renovation. Patrick Davies photo.

Display cases now shine under the new lights installed during the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin’s renovation. Patrick Davies photo.

Display cases now shine under the new lights installed during the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin’s renovation. Patrick Davies photo.

Display cases now shine under the new lights installed during the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin’s renovation. Patrick Davies photo.

Patrick Davies photo                                One of the new exhibits is about the origins of the Williams Lake Tribune itself when we had our start in the 1930s.

Patrick Davies photo One of the new exhibits is about the origins of the Williams Lake Tribune itself when we had our start in the 1930s.

Colourful art lines the walls of parts of the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin. Patrick Davies photo.

Colourful art lines the walls of parts of the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin. Patrick Davies photo.

An exhibit on forest management and forest fires, something many lakecity residents still have vivid memories of. Parick Davies photo.

An exhibit on forest management and forest fires, something many lakecity residents still have vivid memories of. Parick Davies photo.

An exhibit on tools used in the Cariboo Chilcotin. Patrick Davies photo.

An exhibit on tools used in the Cariboo Chilcotin. Patrick Davies photo.

A vintage dental set from the early twentieth century used by Williams Lake dentist Lloyd Bothamley. Patrick Davies photo.

A vintage dental set from the early twentieth century used by Williams Lake dentist Lloyd Bothamley. Patrick Davies photo.

Just Posted

A health worker holds a vial of AstraZeneca vaccine to be administered to members of the police at a COVID-19 vaccination center in Mainz, Germany, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. (Andreas Arnold/dpa via AP)
43 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health

368 cases in the region remain active

A sign is seen this past summer outside Yunesit’in Government office west of Williams Lake reminding visitors and members to stay safe amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Rebecca Dyok photo)
Yunesit’in First Nation completes second round of vaccinations

A total of 26 people have since recovered from COVID-19 after having tested positive

A 100 Mile RCMP officer stands watch at the intersction of Highway 97 and Horse Lake Road. (Patrick Davies photo - 100 Mile Free Press)
Volunteers, police search Highway 97 for articles related to high-speed chase

Search will stretch from Canco Gas Station in Lac La Hache to 150 Mile House.

An aerial photograph captures snowmobile tracks in the Cameron Ridge area earlier this year, which is closed to snowmobilers. The closures are in place to protect sensitive caribou herds. (Conservation Officer Service photo)
Snowmobilers fined for operating in closed caribou habitat near Likely, B.C.

The investigation revealed they had spent several hours in the closure leaving extensive tracks

The RCMP arrest one of the suspects on Highway 97 courtesy of cell phone footage shot by a bystander. (April Thomas photo)
WATCH: Two suspects arrested after multi-jurisdictional chase

A half dozen police cars were seen heading north on Highway 97

Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Dr. Bonnie Henry pauses for a moment as she gives her daily media briefing regarding COVID-19 for British Columbia in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
7 additional deaths and 542 new COVID-19 cases in B.C.

Provincial health officials reported 18 new COVID-19 cases linked to variants of concern

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The City of Vancouver estimates there are 3,500 Canada geese in the city right now, and that number is growing. (Bruce Hogarth)
Help tame Vancouver’s Canada goose population by reporting nests: park officials

The city is asking residents to be on the lookout so staff can remove nests or addle eggs

Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson (Office of the Chief Justice)
Judge questions whether B.C.’s top doctor appreciated right to religious freedom

Lawyer for province says Dr. Henry has outlined the reasons for her orders publicly

A sample of guns seized at the Pacific Highway border crossing from the U.S. into B.C. in 2014. Guns smuggled from the U.S. are used in criminal activity, often associated with drug gangs. (Canada Border Service Agency)
B.C. moves to seize vehicles transporting illegal firearms

Bill bans sale of imitation or BB guns to young people

BC Housing minister David Eby is concerned that Penticton council’s decision to close a local homeless shelter will result in a “tent city” similar to this one in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / Black Press file)
‘Disappointed and baffled’ B.C. housing minister warns of tent city in Penticton

Penticton council’s decision to close a local homeless shelter could create tent city, says David Eby

A recently published study out of UBC has found a link between life satisfaction levels and overall health. (Pixabay)
Satisfied with life? It’s likely you’re healthier for it: UBC study

UBC psychologists have found those more satisfied with their life have a 26% reduced risk of dying

A vial of some of the first 500,000 of the two million AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine doses that Canada has secured through a deal with the Serum Institute of India in partnership with Verity Pharma at a facility in Milton, Ont., on Wednesday, March 3, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Carlos Osorio - POOL
Federal panel recommends 4-month gap between COVID vaccine doses due to limited supply

The recommendation applies to all COVID-19 vaccines currently approved in Canada

A vial of Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a family doctor office, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 in Paris. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP -Christophe Ena
Trudeau ‘optimistic’ that timeline for rollout of COVID vaccines can be accelerated

Canada set to receive more than 6M COVID-19 vaccine dose than initially expected, by end of March

Most Read