Marilyn Dickson with some of the textiles for the July 8 event at Beeocheese. Tickets are available at the Station House Gallery

Marilyn Dickson with some of the textiles for the July 8 event at Beeocheese. Tickets are available at the Station House Gallery

Major textile exhibit visits lakecity

Lakecity residents will have a unique opportunity next week to view some of the richest examples of fabric art to come out of India in an evening of cultural immersion called India: Through the Eye of a Needle.

Lakecity residents will have a unique opportunity next week to view some of the richest examples of fabric art to come out of India in an evening of cultural immersion called India: Through the Eye of a Needle.

The event happens July 8 at Beeotcheese Bistro & Bakery and is a fundraiser for the Station House Gallery.

“Join us for a gala Station House fundraising evening exploring textile treasures and culture from the Indian desert and the Vancouver Museum embroidery collection,” encourages event organizer Marilyn Dickson.

Dickson says this dazzling array of world-class textiles from the Maiwa Foundation has previously been exhibited at museums across Canada. 

Several rare and traditional quilts will also be on display during the evening.

The evening also includes an intimate portrayal of the artisans who created the textiles through photos and video.

There will be ethnic appetizers by Beeotcheese chefs, music by DJ RecordC (aka Dr. Amarjot Sajan), and  a cash bar.

The cultural evening opens the Common Threads exhibit that will be at the Station House Gallery through July and August.

Tickets are available at the Station House Gallery, Fabricland, and Ibea’s Quilting.

Dickson says the Maiwa Foundation works to secure fair market value for artisans who continue to make fabric, and embroidered and embellished textiles in traditional ways.

Women from the Kutch Mahila Vika Sangathan co-operative are keeping alive the generations of knowledge that has been passed down through their embroidered designs. Self-sufficiency for village artisans is largely dependent on a recognition of value by western markets.

In 2002 the Maiwa Foundation, in conjunction with the Kutch Mahila Vikas Sangathan co-operative, Maiwa Handprints Ltd., the Vancouver Museum and other funders mounted an exhibition of embroidery from tribal groups living in the Kutch Desert in efforts to raise awareness about the true market value of traditional textile crafts.