Law student gains experience in the lakecity

Thompson Rivers University second-year law student Clare Hauser has been working at John Russell barrister and solicitor in Williams Lake.

Thompson Rivers University second-year law student Clare Hauser has been working at John Russell barrister and solicitor in Williams Lake since May and will continue through the summer.

Her placement in the lakecity was solidified through Rural Education and Access to Lawyers (REAL), a program funded by the Canadian Bar Association BC Branch (CBABC).

The program arose due to access to legal services concerns in the profession of the increasing average age of lawyers in small communities and the preference among new lawyers to practice in urban areas, CBABC said.

“It’s great because it offers a solid source of assistance,” Hauser said of the program.

She described her placement at Russell’s office as a temporary articling position.

It is not as official as full articling because she doesn’t have to do rotations through the different types of law, she explained.

“Basically I’m learning the office, getting to know other lawyers in town, and learning about the type of law John does, which is mainly commercial and conveyancing.”

Office secretary Christine Mason said Hauser’s “quite a firecracker.”

“So far she’s worked on a dispute case, some wills and done some research and she’s been offered an articling position here for the following year.”

Hauser grew up in Victoria attending boarding school because her father worked around the world.

Her interest in law began while pursuing a bachelor of arts degree, she said.

During a co-op position with the Canadian Forces Base she worked in human resources doing labour related files.

“I had to go through cases between the government and the unions and found that interesting.”

A stint at the Ministry of Children and Family Development in Victoria where she met several lawyers working on family law also solidified her desire to pursue the profession.

“I wasn’t sick of it yet, I thought most of the lawyers I met were very proactive, and decided it would suit me,” she chuckled.

Hauser said she chose to study law at TRU because Kamloops is plunked in the middle of the province and a good hub to network from.

“I thought it would be a good opportunity if I wanted to work in a smaller centre other than Victoria or Vancouver.”

Every day on the job in Williams Lake is different and because Russell is the sole lawyer in the firm she is gaining a variety of experiences, she added.

Aside from studying law, Hauser plays the violin, loves to read and travel.

She also loves animals and that’s worked out well because the people she’s staying with in 150 Mile House have animals as do many of the people she works with.er.

Her placement in the lakecity was solidified through Rural Education and Access to Lawyers (REAL), a program funded by the Canadian Bar Association BC Branch (CBABC).

The program arose due to access to legal services concerns in the profession of the increasing average age of lawyers in small communities and the preference among new lawyers to practice in urban areas, CBABC said.

“It’s great because it offers a solid source of assistance,” Hauser said of the program.

She described her placement at Russell’s office as a temporary articling position.

It is not as official as full articling because she doesn’t have to do rotations through the different types of law, she explained.

“Basically I’m learning the office, getting to know other lawyers in town, and learning about the type of law John does, which is mainly commercial and conveyancing.”

Office secretary Christine Mason said Hauser’s “quite a firecracker.”

“So far she’s worked on a dispute case, some wills and done some research and she’s been offered an articling position here for the following year.”

Hauser grew up in Victoria attending boarding school because her father worked around the world.

Her interest in law began while pursuing a bachelor of arts degree, she said.

During a co-op position with the Canadian Forces Base she worked in human resources doing labour related files.

“I had to go through cases between the government and the unions and found that interesting.”

A stint at the Ministry of Children and Family Development in Victoria where she met several lawyers working on family law also solidified her desire to pursue the profession.

“I wasn’t sick of it yet, I thought most of the lawyers I met were very proactive, and decided it would suit me,” she chuckled.

Hauser said she chose to study law at TRU because Kamloops is plunked in the middle of the province and a good hub to network from.

“I thought it would be a good opportunity if I wanted to work in a smaller centre other than Victoria or Vancouver.”

Every day on the job in Williams Lake is different and because Russell is the sole lawyer in the firm she is gaining a variety of experiences, she added.

Aside from studying law, Hauser plays the violin, loves to read and travel.

She also loves animals and that’s worked out well because the people she’s staying with in 150 Mile House have animals as do many of the people she works with.

 

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