Tamsin Kelsey takes a long look at the multi-media piece Remember the Magdelenas by Maureen le Bourdais. Kelsey

Tamsin Kelsey takes a long look at the multi-media piece Remember the Magdelenas by Maureen le Bourdais. Kelsey

Laundry an artistic commentary on life

Whether it is washing your own clothing or watching the mound of laundry pile up on the floor, laundry is a constant in most people’s lives.

Tara Sprickerhoff

Tribune Staff Writer

Whether it is washing your own clothing or watching the mound of laundry pile up on the floor, laundry is a constant in most people’s lives.

The Station House Gallery has embraced these ideas in its summer show: Laundry.

The show, which opened last Thursday, features a collection of artwork submitted by artists around the community and Western Canada.

Each piece of art shows a different aspect of laundry, whether it be the Laundry Maker, women working at a laundry, or the laundry itself.

Some of the art was fun loving, including a line of clay laundry hung out to dry.

Other pieces took a more serious approach, including one called Airing the Dirty Laundry, which featured the orange shirt used as a symbol during the reconciliation events in Williams Lake over a background showing a First Nations class in a residential school as well as a residential school itself.

“It’s interesting when you take a topic like this, how diverse the expression will be.

“We have some very political submissions right up to the flippant, silly and lighthearted in the same room,” says curator and exhibit co-ordinator Glen Burrill.

The show features 23 pieces of art by 11 artists.

Earlier in the year the Station House Gallery put out a call for submissions fitting the theme of Laundry.

Alongside a committee, Burrill looks at the submissions as they come in for various aspects of artistic expression and how they would fit in the overall unity of the show.

One painting shows a line of laundry in behind a garden of flowers, with the title Laundry, I’d Rather be Gardening.

The artist, Cathie Allen, says her laundry piles up during the summer because of things she’d rather be doing.

“It stays on the line for a long time,” Allen says.

Another piece, a set of two photographs by Marilyn Dickson shows women from India working in a laundry.

“This is their life. Everyday they do other people’s laundry. I’m trying to portray what it felt like,” Dickson says.

One of her pictures was entitled Some Work Harder for the Money.

Overall the exhibit is a beautiful display of the different aspects of people’s lives and how the very ordinary — laundry — can be seen in extraordinary ways.