Marilyn Dickson displays some of the textiles that will be on display at the gala fundraising evening for the Station House Gallery on July 8 at Beeotcheese Bistro & Bakery. Tickets are available at the Station House Gallery

Marilyn Dickson displays some of the textiles that will be on display at the gala fundraising evening for the Station House Gallery on July 8 at Beeotcheese Bistro & Bakery. Tickets are available at the Station House Gallery

International textile exhibit coming next week

Lakecity residents will have a unique opportunity next week to view some of the richest examples of fabric art to come out of India in an evening of cultural immersion called India: Through the Eye of a Needle.

Lakecity residents will have a unique opportunity next week to view some of the richest examples of fabric art to come out of India in an evening of cultural immersion called India: Through the Eye of a Needle.

The event happens July 8 at Beeotcheese Bistro & Bakery and is a fundraiser for the Station House Gallery.

“Join us for a gala Station House fundraising evening exploring textile treasures and culture from the Indian desert and the Vancouver Museum embroidery collection,” encourages event organizer Marilyn Dickson.

Dickson says this dazzling array of world-class textiles from the Maiwa Foundation has previously been exhibited at museums across Canada. 

Several rare and traditional quilts will also be on display during the evening.

The evening also includes an intimate portrayal of the artisans who created the textiles through photos and video.

There will be ethnic appetizers by Beeotcheese chefs, music by DJ RecordC (aka Dr. Amarjot Sajan), and  a cash bar.

The cultural evening opens the Common Threads exhibit that will be at the Station House Gallery through July and August.

Dickson says the Maiwa Foundation works to secure fair market value for artisans who continue to make fabric, and embroidered and embellished textiles in traditional ways.

In many regions of India, Pakistan, Morocco and other eastern countries, Dickson says people distinguish themselves from a particular area or as part of a particular group by the intricate patterns in the fabric of their clothing.

But today she says global demand for these beautiful hand-crafted fabrics, has put pressure on artisans to abandon their traditional way of creating and decorating fabric in favor of faster methods of production and simplifying designs in order to support their families. 

As a result, she says the textile traditions of producing world-class embroidery that made their ancestors famous are being lost at an alarming rate.

Self-sufficiency for village artisans is largely dependent on a recognition of value by western markets.

In 2002 the Maiwa Foundation, in conjunction with the Kutch Mahila Vikas Sangathan co-operative, Maiwa Handprints Ltd., the Vancouver Museum and other funders mounted an exhibition of embroidery from tribal groups living in the Kutch Desert in efforts to raise awareness about the true market value of traditional textile crafts. 

Women from the Kutch Mahila Vika Sangathan co-operative are keeping alive the generations of knowledge that has been passed down through their embroidered designs.

Working in a cooperative setting has empowered the women to recognize the true value of their craft in a global sense, receive fair market value for their work, and protect them from predatory buyers.

It also elevates their status within their families and communities and allows them to continue living in their own villages while bringing financial resources to their families.

Handmade craft, which builds on traditional skills and displays high quality workmanship cannot be easily copied by either industrial means or unskilled labour. 

Moreover, the market is willing to pay a premium for an absence of synthetic content.

In craft this usually means the exclusive use of natural dyes and natural fibers produced and used in environmentally sound ways.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A detour via Mission Road is in place Sunday, Feb. 28 due to a vehicle incident. (Anna Fait photo)
Highway 97 closed south of Williams Lake Sunday morning, detour in place

Overnight, Williams Lake saw six centimetres of snowfall, according to Environment Canada

Researchers in B.C. say earlier than usual return of bats or dead bats can indicate trouble, such as signs of white-nose syndrome. (Cathy Koot photo)
Public help is essential for monitoring for bat disease

Anyone finding a dead bat is asked to report it to the BC Community Bat Program

Sandi Griffiths is the region’s new district manager of transportation for the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
New MOTI district manager takes the wheel in Williams Lake

Sandi Griffiths replaces Todd Hubner who retired recently

Mclean Silverton rides a rail in Boitanio Park - one of seven new features installed by the city this past week. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Snow park in Boitanio open for riding

If any users find that the park requires attention, please contact city hall at 250-392-2311

A snowfall warning has been issued for Williams Lake and Quesnel. (Black Press Media)
Snowfall warning issued for Cariboo region

Between 10 to 15 cm expected

Abbotsford’s Kris Collins turned to TikTok out of boredom when the provincial COVID-19 lockdown began in March 2020. She now has over 23 million followers on the video app. Photo: Submitted
Internet famous: Abbotsford’s Kris Collins is a TikTok comedy queen

Collins has found surprise stardom alone with a phone

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday December 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C.’s compromise on in-person worship at three churches called ‘absolutely unacceptable’

Would allow outdoor services of 25 or less by Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack churches

Baldy Mountain Resort was shut down on Saturday after a fatal workplace accident. (Baldy Mountain picture)
Jasmine and Gwen Donaldson are part of the CAT team working to reduce stigma for marginalized groups in Campbell River. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror
Jasmine’s story: Stigma can be the hardest hurdle for those overcoming addiction

Recovering B.C. addict says welcome, connection and community key for rebuilding after drug habit

A Vancouver restaurant owner was found guilty of violating B.C.’s Human Rights Code by discriminating against customers on the basis of their race. (Pixabay)
Vancouver restaurant owner ordered to pay $4,000 to customers after racist remark

Referring to patrons as ‘you Arabs’ constitutes discrimination under B.C.’s Human Rights Code, ruling deems

Nanaimo children’s author and illustrator Lindsay Ford’s latest book is ‘Science Girl.’ (Photo courtesy Lindsay Ford)
B.C. children’s writer encourages girls to pursue the sciences in new book

Lindsay Ford is holding a virtual launch for latest book, ‘Science Girl’

Pig races at the 145th annual Chilliwack Fair on Aug. 12, 2017. Monday, March 1, 2021 is Pig Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Feb. 28 to March 6

Pig Day, Canadian Bacon Day and Grammar Day are all coming up this week

Staff from the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre, passersby, RCMP and Nanaimo Fire Rescue carried a sick 300-kilogram steller sea lion up the steep bluff at Invermere Beach in north Nanaimo in an attempt to save the animal’s life Thursday. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Rescue Centre)
300-kilogram sea lion muscled up from B.C. beach in rescue attempt

Animal dies despite efforts of Nanaimo marine mammal rescue team, emergency personnel and bystanders

Most Read