Harminder Saini (left), Jasvir Vaid, and Jasvir Dherari with some of the many different types of sweet snacks served during Vaisakhi celebrations in 2016. The community is invited to join them this weekend at the celebrations which include a tea with such treats Saturday afternoon before the flag raising ceremony. Gaeil Farrar photo

Harminder Saini (left), Jasvir Vaid, and Jasvir Dherari with some of the many different types of sweet snacks served during Vaisakhi celebrations in 2016. The community is invited to join them this weekend at the celebrations which include a tea with such treats Saturday afternoon before the flag raising ceremony. Gaeil Farrar photo

Guru Nanak Sikh Temple celebrates Vaisakhi this weekend

The Guru Nanak Sikh Temple congregation invited the community to celebrate Vaisakhi with them this weekend.

If you’ve ever wondered what happens at a Sikh Temple during Vaisahki celebrations, this is the weekend to go check it out.

Guru Nanak Sikh Temple president Dalvinder S. Galsian invites the whole community to visit the temple during the Vaisakhi celebrations which will include vegetarian breakfasts, lunches and dinners served during the three-day celebration.

Vaisakhi celebrates the founding of the Sikh faith in 1699.

Celebrations begin with prayers at 8 a.m. Friday, May 5 followed by the reading of the Sikh holy book Sri-Gur Granth Sahib at 9 a.m. Members of the congregation take turns reading the 1,430 -page book continuously until Bhog, or conclusion of the reading at 9 a.m. on Sunday morning.

A special luncheon concludes the celebrations at noon on Sunday morning, May 7, after ceremonies in the temple hall.

The traditional flag raising ceremony takes place Saturday, May 6 starting with tea and refreshments from 4 to 5 p.m. in the temple kitchen and the flag raising starting at 5 p.m.

The flag raising, which includes prayers and raising a new Khalsa flag will be followed by a vegetarian dinner starting at 6:30 p.m. in the temple’s community kitchen.

Sikh Priests Baljinder Singh, Kalvinder Singh and Jagir Sing have been leading prayers at the temple each evening this week and will be part of the ceremonies this weekend.

It is noted that heads are covered (scarves are provided) and shoes are removed when entering the Sikh temple worship hall for prayers. Alcohol and tobacco are not permitted and all meals are vegetarian.