TRU professor Dr. Chris Montoya answers some questions posed by Shelby Doerkson (right) during the first CSI Crime Night event held at the university last fall. The university is hosting its second mystery crime night this Thursday evening from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. All participants will have their names entered into a draw for an Amazon Kindle e-Reader. Other prizes will also be awarded to winners.

TRU professor Dr. Chris Montoya answers some questions posed by Shelby Doerkson (right) during the first CSI Crime Night event held at the university last fall. The university is hosting its second mystery crime night this Thursday evening from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. All participants will have their names entered into a draw for an Amazon Kindle e-Reader. Other prizes will also be awarded to winners.

Gold rush tent town setting for TRU CSI night

The CSI Crime Night returns to Thompson Rivers University this Thursday, Oct. 20.

The CSI Crime Night that was such a big hit with the community last year returns to Thompson Rivers University this Thursday, Oct. 20 from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m.

All participants will be entered into a draw for an Amazon Kindle e-Reader.

Winning teams will also be awarded other great prizes.

The setting:

The date was May 19, 1922 and banner headlines in the Vancouver papers read Williams Lake, City of Tents.

John Likely’s belief in undiscovered gold in the Cedar Creek area had caused around 7,000 potential prospectors to journey to Williams Lake and there were few accommodations available.

The Log Cabin Hotel had been quickly filled, as had the Borland Ranch Boarding House, so many of the newly arrived were forced to live in a myriad of tents that had sprouted like toadstools in the downtown area almost overnight.

The newly established town was in the process of rebuilding after more than half the businesses had been wiped out in the fire of July 10, 1921.  The blaze started in the Fraser and Mackenzie Store and spread rapidly, killing two men, George Bernard Weetman and Johnny Salmon.

According to the rumours, Johnny had been lucky on his claim in Likely and had been seen with a pouch of gold nuggets shortly before the fire.

However, no one was sure whether he had buried the gold under the floor of his rooming house or whether he had been carrying it with him when he was in the store. Both buildings had been destroyed and the land was now being cleared for rebuilding.

The characters:

Dudley Knolls, a 31-year-old Scottish immigrant from Edinburgh, had been prospecting in California when he heard gold had been found near Likely.  He arrived in Williams Lake in April 1922 and soon found a job with other unemployed men in rebuilding the lost businesses. He had been living in a shack he rented from Phoebe that was located behind the post office, where he had heard stories of Johnny Salmon’s lost gold.

Dudley was a difficult man, prone to a quick temper, which many of his co-workers excused when they had heard his story.

After a few drinks, he had told them about an “accident” that had resulted in two broken legs, causing him to limp and to experience bouts of extreme pain.

Also while under the influence of alcohol, Dudley bragged that he would find Johnny’s lost gold nuggets and quit working forever.  Even though Dudley drank a lot, he worked hard, trying to stay away from the alcohol that usually drove him to pick fights. He was also a heavy smoker.

Silas Bryerly, born in New Westminster, had lived in Williams Lake since May 1920.

Silas had been working as a general hand at the livery and feed barn operated by Angus Brown, who deducted a third of his paycheque for letting Silas live in a room in the back of the livery.

However, since he didn’t get along well with Angus, he was planning soon on joining the other prospectors in Likely in the hopes of making his fortune.

Silas was engaged to Mavis but that didn’t stop him from having a “roving eye” when it came to the ladies.

Mavis Quince had arrived from California in September 1919 on the first P.G.E. train to come to Williams Lake.

Premier John Oliver had assisted in the geographical construction of the new town and his main focus had been on facilitating the railway.  Mavis worked at Fred Bucholtz’s bakery during the week, but took odd jobs on the weekends to make extra money.

One of these jobs, cleaning rooms at the Borland Ranch Boarding House, she did in exchange for a place to live.  She had met Silas at the first Williams Lake Stampede in 1920, and they had become engaged by Christmas.  Mavis was anxious to raise her status in the new town and the way she believed she could do this was to have a big house and fancy clothes.

For more on the mystery pick up the Thursday edition of the Tribune for part 2 and to prepare for the crime night adventure ahead of time on Thursday evening.

 

Just Posted

Doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine are seen being prepared on Wednesday, May 12, 2021, in Decatur, Ga. Hundreds of children, ages 12 to 15, received the Pfizer vaccine at the DeKalb Pediatric Center, just days after it was approved for use within their age group. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)
One death, 60 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

The death is connected to the outbreak at Spring Valley long-term care in Kelowna

(File photo)
Firearms investigation on Winger Road the result of increased gang activity: RCMP

When police attempted to stop a vehicle, it sped away

Shearwater is located in the Great Bear Rainforest on the West Coast of B.C. (Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Tourism Association photo)
Heiltsuk Nation buys historic Shearwater Resort and Marina

Chief Marilyn Slett said Heiltsuk Nation has always valued its relationship with the company

Prince Rupert was one of the first B.C. communities targeted for mass vaccination after a steep rise in infections. Grey area marks community-wide vaccine distribution. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. tracks big drop in COVID-19 infections after vaccination

Prince Rupert, Indigenous communities show improvement

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The bodies of Carlo and Erick Fryer were discovered by a local couple walking on a remote forest road in Naramata on May 10. (Submitted)
Kamloops brothers identified as pair found dead near Penticton

The bodies of Carlo and Erick Fryer were discovered by a local couple walking

Municipal governments around B.C. have emergency authority to conduct meetings online, use mail voting and spend reserve funds on operation expenses. (Penticton Western News)
Online council meetings, mail-in voting option to be extended in B.C.

Proposed law makes municipal COVID-19 exceptions permanent

A nurse prepares a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16. (Phil McLachlan/Black Press)
British Columbians aged 20+ can book for vaccine Saturday, those 18+ on Sunday

‘We are also actively working to to incorporate the ages 12 to 17 into our immunization program’

The AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine. (AP/Eranga Jayawardena)
2nd person in B.C. diagnosed with rare blood clotting after AstraZeneca vaccine

The man, in his 40s, is currently receiving care at a hospital in the Fraser Health region

Brian Peach rescues ducklings from a storm drain in Smithers May 12. (Lauren L’Orsa video screen shot)
VIDEO: Smithers neighbours rescue ducklings from storm drain

Momma and babies made it safely back to the creek that runs behind Turner Way

Signage for ICBC, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia, is shown in Victoria, B.C., on February 6, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
$150 refunds issued to eligible customers following ICBC’s switch to ‘enhanced care’

Savings amassed from the insurance policy change will lead to one-time rebates for close to 4 million customers

Police investigate a fatal 2011 shooting in a strip mall across from Central City Shopping Centre, which was deemed a gang hit. The Mayor’s Gang Task Force zeroed in on ways to reduce gang involvement and activity. (File photo)
COVID-19 could be a cause in public nature of B.C. gang violence: expert

Martin Bouchard says the pandemic has changed people’s routines and they aren’t getting out of their homes often, which could play a role in the brazen nature of shootings

Most Read