Tsihlqot’in community radio co-ordinator Crystal Harry Rain, left, interviews the winning team of Joyce Charleyboy (centre) and her grandchildren Makiya Cooper, 10, and Winoah Cooper, 11. Monica Lamb-Yorski photos

Tsihlqot’in community radio co-ordinator Crystal Harry Rain, left, interviews the winning team of Joyce Charleyboy (centre) and her grandchildren Makiya Cooper, 10, and Winoah Cooper, 11. Monica Lamb-Yorski photos

First-ever Tsilhqot’in master chef challenge sizzles

Teams of grandparents, parents, children and grandchildren cooked on an open fire

With the blue sky above and melting snow and mud underfoot, competitors faced off in the first annual Tsilhqot’in Master Chef Challenge held during Spring Break at Tl’esqox First Nation west of Williams Lake.

The brainchild of Kelsie Marchand, an Indigenous infant development consultant for Denisiqi Service Society, the event stipulated that mothers or grandmothers join with youth to teach them some traditional meal preparation.

“Our main objectives were to bring children into learning about traditional foods and cooking,” Marchand said as four teams of cooks began preparing meals in a parking lot near the community rink. “I’ve gotten the opportunity to taste a lot of their food at cultural camps and it is amazing.”

Read more: PHOTO GALLERY: Tl’etinqox culture camp enjoys new location

Each team was given three ingredients from the land — deer meat, salmon and huckleberries — donated by community members.

Teams had to have children included, and the children were there to learn and be mentored by the women who have been cooking off the land since they were children.

“They have two hours to cook, all the food has to be cooked over the fire with no electricity allowed, and they each had to bring their own cooking equipment,” Marchand said.

The teams came from Tsi Del Del (Redstone), Tl’etinqox (Anaham) and Tl’esqox (Toosey).

“We put out an invitation on social media and put up posters and contacted people directly,” Marchand said.

Joyce Charleyboy with her grandchildren Winoah Cooper, Makiya Cooper and Tommy Lulua emerged the winners for their deer stew, bannock and salad featuring greens and huckleberries.

Her team’s name was Ki Del Del which translates as Red Willow, the area where Charleyboy grew up.

“I had chilies with lettuce, huckleberries and green onions in the salad,” Makiya said.

As for the stew, Winoah said she chopped celery, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes and deer meet for it.

Charleyboy said the secret to her bannock’s success was the temperature of the water, to which Makiya whispered, “hush, don’t tell the secret.”

The children said they planned to use the $1,000 prize for a holiday.

Elder Bella Alphonse said she voted for Charleyboy’s team’s food because it reminded her of the stew she ate as a child.

“The stew was just exactly how my ?inkwel (mom) used to make it, not heavy on the spices but had that certain taste to it,” Alphonse said.

Team ?Elagi Del Del (Red Flowers) won for the best name and was made up of Tia Sellars, Tashina Johnny, Yellicyia Elkins and Natyra Elkins. They won a basket of goodies.

Their meal consisted of a deer meat and bacon chili, salmon on cheese and chive bannock, and huckleberry sauce on bannock.

Youth judge Cordell Elkins chose team Alice Johnny and Sophie Tenale’s team for the children’s choice — easy to eat and flavour for children to eat.

With help from Johnny’s grandson Kyler Johnny and granddaughter Giaunna Johnny, they cooked barbecued deer meat with barbecue sauce made by Kyler, bannock and deer stew.

Marchand said funding for the competition came from the First Nations Health Authority’s winter wellness funding opportunity.

Team ?inkwel Bed (Mother’s food) made up of Trena Haller and her daughter Liz Rosette prepared deer stew, bannock and a salad.



news@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Mother-daughter team, ?inkwel Bed, which translates to “mother’s food,” Trena Haller (left) and Liz Rosette organize their ingredients for deer stew, bannock and salad as the first-ever Tsilhqot’in Master Chef Challenge gets underway at Tl’esqox First Nation.

Mother-daughter team, ?inkwel Bed, which translates to “mother’s food,” Trena Haller (left) and Liz Rosette organize their ingredients for deer stew, bannock and salad as the first-ever Tsilhqot’in Master Chef Challenge gets underway at Tl’esqox First Nation.

Alice Johnny stirs the deer stew she and her grandson and granddaughter have prepared.

Alice Johnny stirs the deer stew she and her grandson and granddaughter have prepared.

Kyler Johnny, 13, (left) gets ready to chop fresh sage while Sophie Tenale prepares deer meat for roasting over the fire.

Kyler Johnny, 13, (left) gets ready to chop fresh sage while Sophie Tenale prepares deer meat for roasting over the fire.

The final offering from Alice Johnny’s team, which won for best children’s pick.

The final offering from Alice Johnny’s team, which won for best children’s pick.

The final plate from team Del Del ?egali features a deer and bacon chili, salmon spread on a cheese and chive bannock, with a huckleberry jam-topped bannock.

The final plate from team Del Del ?egali features a deer and bacon chili, salmon spread on a cheese and chive bannock, with a huckleberry jam-topped bannock.

Kelsie Marchand (centre), is an Indigenous infant development consultant at Denisiqi Service Society and organized the first annual Tsilhqot’in Master Chef competition to promote an opportunity for children to learn traditional cooking from mothers and grandmothers.

Kelsie Marchand (centre), is an Indigenous infant development consultant at Denisiqi Service Society and organized the first annual Tsilhqot’in Master Chef competition to promote an opportunity for children to learn traditional cooking from mothers and grandmothers.

The competition attracted four teams of adults and children.

The competition attracted four teams of adults and children.

Joyce Charleyboy and her grandchildren, Makiya Cooper, Tommy Lulua and Winoah Cooper emerged the winners at the first annual Tsilhqot’in Master Chef competition held at Tl’esqox First Nation on Monday, March 18. The children plan to use the $1,000 prize money for a holiday.

Joyce Charleyboy and her grandchildren, Makiya Cooper, Tommy Lulua and Winoah Cooper emerged the winners at the first annual Tsilhqot’in Master Chef competition held at Tl’esqox First Nation on Monday, March 18. The children plan to use the $1,000 prize money for a holiday.

Elder judge Bella Alphonse and youth judge Cordell Elkins try out the food created by team Del Del ?elagi.

Elder judge Bella Alphonse and youth judge Cordell Elkins try out the food created by team Del Del ?elagi.

The final creation from ?inkwel Bed — deer stew, bannock and a salad with cheese.

The final creation from ?inkwel Bed — deer stew, bannock and a salad with cheese.

Just Posted

Many members of the Williams Lake Cross Country Ski Club, not all of which are pictured here, volunteered their time to make the Bull Mountain family fun day happen during the 2019/20 season. (Patrick Davies photo - WIlliams Lake Tribune)
FOREST INK: Recreation information for Williams Lake and surrounding areas: part two

Community groups have been developing the Cariboo as a world leader in outdoor recreation

School District 27 superintendent Chris van der Mark. (Angie Mindus photo)
LETTER: We are seeing an increase in positive exposures in our schools

School District 27 superintendent Chris van der Mark pens a letter to families

Joyce Cooper (left) said she had to set an example for Tsilhqot’in communities by sharing her COVID-19 positive results. (Photo submitted)
Tsideldel off-reserve member documents experience of COVID-19

We should all be supporting one another and not judging each other, says Joyce Cooper

Do you have a Roses and Raspberries? Email editor@wltribune.com. Angie Mindus photo
ROSE: Thanks to all for assistance after fall

Thank you to the staff who responded quickly and kindly

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

A woman injects herself with crack cocaine at a supervised consumption site Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Drug users at greater risk of dying as services scale back in second wave of COVID-19

It pins the blame largely on a lack of supports, a corrupted drug supply

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
‘We’re still in it’: Wet’suwet’en push forward on rights recognition

The 670-km Coastal GasLink pipeline was approved by B.C. and 20 elected First Nations councils on its path

Jennifer Cochrane, a Public Health Nurse with Prairie Mountain Health in Virden, administers the COVID-19 vaccine to Robert Farquhar with Westman Regional Laboratory, during the first day of immunizations at the Brandon COVID-19 vaccination supersite in Brandon, Man., on Monday, January 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tim Smith - POOL
Top doctor urges Canadians to keep up with COVID measures, even as vaccines roll out

More than 776,606 vaccines have been administered so far

From the left: Midway RCMP Csts. Jonathan Stermscheg and Chris Hansen, Public Servant Leanne Mclaren and Cpl. Phil Peters. Pictured in the front are Mclaren’s dog, Lincoln and Peters’ dog, Angel. Photo courtesy of BC RCMP
B.C. Mounties commended for bringing firewood to elderly woman

Cpl. Phil Peters said he and detachment members acted after the woman’s husband went to hospital

Dr. Jerome Leis and Dr. Lynfa Stroud are pictured at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto on Thursday, January 21, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
‘It wasn’t called COVID at the time:’ One year since Canada’s first COVID-19 case

The 56-year-old man was admitted to Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

An Uber driver’s vehicle is seen after the company launched service, in Vancouver, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. Several taxi companies have lost a court bid to run Uber and Lyft off the road in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Taxi companies lose court bid to quash Uber, Lyft approvals in British Columbia

Uber said in a statement that the ruling of the justice is clear and speaks for itself

A 75-year-old aircraft has been languishing in a parking lot on the campus of the University of the Fraser Valley, but will soon be moved to the B.C. Aviation Museum. (Paul Henderson/ Chilliwack Progress)
Vintage military aircraft moving from Chilliwack to new home at B.C. Aviation Museum

The challenging move to Vancouver Island will be documented by Discovery Channel film crews

Most Read