Phil Ransom (centre) teaches a birding class through the Cariboo Chilcotin Elder College last year. (Angie Mindus Photo- Williams Lake Tribune)

Elder College back with 27 courses this Spring

Membership sign up is on Jan. 15 while course registration takes place on Jan. 22

At the Cariboo Chilcotin Elder College, a new semester has brung fresh learning opportunities and a new deadline to register for their exciting roster of courses.

The signup for annual memberships in the Elder College’s Spring and Fall 2020 courses will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 15 at the Seniors Activity Centre from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. For $10, residents can buy a membership that will fast track them through registration for courses later on in the month. It should be noted that a membership is required to take any courses at all, so this event is a great way to get yourself in their system early.

Read More: Over 30 unique, diverse courses available at Elder College

On Jan. 22 from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. once more, this time at St. Andrew’s United Church, prospective students will have the first pick of all the courses on offer during the Spring of 2020 this year. For those unable to attend on Jan. 22 a late registration day will take place on Jan. 29 at the Seniors Activity Centre and will be the last chance to register in any remaining classes for the Spring of 2020.

There are 27 courses to choose from, five of which are free of charge, with each costing around $10 to $40 depending on the activity and the supplies needed. These include a mix of new prospects and old favourites including Breeding Birds Of The Williams Lake River Valley, Acoustic Musical Jam Sessions, Yoga For Seniors, Pruning Abc’s For Trees, Shrubs and Roses and Walk-in Computer Clinics. Whatever your interests or mobility, there should be something fun and interesting for you to do.

For a complete course list with the courses prices and descriptions, check out https://www.wleldercollege.com/ and remember, we’re never too old to learn something new.



patrick.davies@wltribune.com

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