File photo                                Sharon Hoffman (left) and Harry Jennings perform at a Medieval Market in years past.

File photo Sharon Hoffman (left) and Harry Jennings perform at a Medieval Market in years past.

Come one, come all to Williams Lake’s Medieval Market

Christmas market runs Nov. 25 and 26 this year.

Hear ye, hear ye! Ye olde Medieval Market is nigh.

In true Shakespearian fashion, the Medieval Market is once again returning to Lake City Secondary School.

A favourite of the Christmas market circuit, the Medieval Market is making a point this year to encourage people to shop local.

“This adage has never been as important as it is this year,” writes Melinda McKinnon, an English teacher at the Williams Lake campus.

“During the unprecedented wildfire season of 2017, the ties that bind the people of the Cariboo became abundantly clear. It was a season of neighbour helping neighbour, employees helping employers and more importantly, community helping community. The Medieval Market of 2017 provides the unique opportunity to allow these bonds to continue by supporting the hardworking and local artisans of the Cariboo; thereby further supporting the idea of ‘Cariboo Strong’.”

Organizer Christie Mayall agrees.

“Especially in this time, when our economy is suffering a little, it is important to support our friends and neighbours who do beautiful work.”

The majority of this year’s more than 90 vendors hail from the Cariboo and Mayall says the quality of the craftsmanship on display will be evident.

“What makes this market special is that it is a juried market so that everything that people are selling is of the highest quality and everything that is sold there is handmade by the vendor.”

The atmosphere created by the medieval theme adds a unique element to the market, which is a fundraiser for local high school students.

“You are supporting the kids at the school; you are supporting the programs and at the same time you are getting fabulous presents for people,” says Mayall.

“A lot of times students get a bad rap and people say ‘Oh, teenagers these days.’ It really showcases them in a positive light because they help the vendors; they are working at the market to raise money, so you know they are working, they are being really positive and outgoing and helpful. It is showcasing students in a positive light too.”

This year’s market includes music on two stages during both market days along with other local talent features: Carmen and Dena, Big Lake Symphony Orchestra, Troy Forcier, Brandon and Dena, Quintet Plus and the Lake City Secondary Bands.

Vendors new and old will be at the market this year, boasting scarves, steampunk jewelry, photography and more.

The market runs on Nov. 25 and 26 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday admission is $5, which includes a weekend pass, while Sunday costs only $3. The admission also gets your name entered in a draw for over 80 door prizes, as well as a courtesy coat and baggage check.