Cariboo Potters’ Guild Fall Sale Nov. 5 and 6: Think globally, shop locally

A display of some found and salvaged items used in making pottery as well as some pottery which made use of found and salvaged items to create unique pieces. (Ruth Lloyd photo - Williams Lake Tribune)A display of some found and salvaged items used in making pottery as well as some pottery which made use of found and salvaged items to create unique pieces. (Ruth Lloyd photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Donna Bulow, secretary of the Cariboo Potters' Guild. Photo: Ruth Lloyd, WL Tribune.
An assembly of bowls made by Anita Fullerton. Photo by Anita Fullerton. (Photo submitted)An assembly of bowls made by Anita Fullerton. Photo by Anita Fullerton. (Photo submitted)
Pieces made by Colleen Kielman. (Photo submitted)Pieces made by Colleen Kielman. (Photo submitted)
Mugs handmade by Colleen Kielman. (Photo submitted)Mugs handmade by Colleen Kielman. (Photo submitted)
Pottery pieces made by Jean Webster. (Photo submitted)Pottery pieces made by Jean Webster. (Photo submitted)
Pottery pieces made by Jean Webster. (Photo submitted)Pottery pieces made by Jean Webster. (Photo submitted)

Cariboo shoppers will have multiple opportunities to help support the climate with upcoming markets and sales by local producers, starting with a Cariboo Potters’ Guild fall sale this weekend.

With world leaders gathering in the United Kingdom for the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP 26) to discuss what to do about the climate crisis, individual citizens often feel overwhelmed.

The climate crisis has hit home for many in British Columbia, and Cariboo residents are no strangers to the impacts it is causing.

Catastrophic wildfires have burned properties, forced residents from homes, and instability caused by the resulting destruction of forests in the watersheds has caused flooding and landslides.

The northern and interior parts of B.C. have been on the frontlines of these for years, and the whole province was impacted this year. The town of Lytton burned to the ground after record temperatures. In all of B.C., the B.C. Coroner’s Service estimates there were 526 heat-related deaths during the week of June 25-July 1 this year.

So what can people in the Cariboo do to make changes now to help lessen our impact as citizens of the Earth that will help support this place we love?

What if there was something easy you could do to reduce plastic packaging, cut the greenhouse gas emissions of your holiday spending, and keep more money in the local community?

As some of the worst per capita emitters (according to Our World in Data, Canadians emit over 15 tonnes of CO2 per capita), choices Canadians make can potentially have a larger impact than many other global citizens.

Products made locally mean less transportation and can sometimes mean using more local materials.

The Cariboo Potters’ Guild and other artists’ groups also add to these benefits because the artisans can utilize many reusable items which may otherwise end up in a waste facility.

Donna Bulow, the guild’s secretary, rolled off the examples of different found items like cookie cutters or rolling pins salvaged from thrift stores and salvaged leaves or bark many potters use to create unique pieces. Everything from left over pieces of sheetrock, old toothbrushes, and embossed wallpaper can add to a potter’s work or be used in the craft. Plastic containers are used for glazes, doilies create patterns, the list goes on.

Old newspapers are used to keep fresh pots from sticking as they dry and then reused again to support shaped pieces as they stiffen. Broken finished pottery is used in mosaics and as garden decor.

It is all about experimentation and innovation, according to Bulow.

“It’s so exciting,” said Bulow. “Nothing seems to get thrown away.”

Leftover scraps of clay are salvaged and used again, some are even set aside for when the guild introduces children to clay at the annual Children’s Festival.

The potters also put on the Empty Bowls fundraiser, where potters donate handmade bowls to sell to raise money for the local Salvation Army food bank. These benefits add to the community in multiple ways.

The Cariboo Potters’ Guild will be hosting its fall sale at the Central Cariboo Arts Centre on Nov. 5, 12 to 7 p.m, and Nov. 6, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Station House Gallery will be hosting local artists and artisans for its Christmas Market starting on Monday, Nov. 15th this year at the gallery at 1 Mackenzie Avenue. Pottery will be for sale alongside textiles, ornaments, local music, books by local authors, paintings and sculptures, handmade knives and wood crafts, specialty locally produced herbs and chocolates.

This year’s theme is black and gold.

“We’re going with a sumptuous theme this year,” said Diane Toop, executive director.

The Stationhouse is open Monday to Friday 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Medieval Market will be making a comeback, after a year off, and will be more local than in the past, with fewer vendors and limited capacity to keep patrons safe. Vaccine passports will be required to enter.

The vendors at the Medieval Market will offer products from local wood, pine needle baskets, upcycled jewelry and ornaments, local and regional farm products.

The Medieval Market will be at Williams Lake Secondary School (WLSS) at 640 Carson Drive Nov. 20, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. This event helps support programs at WLSS.

Read More: Cariboo Potters Guild fall sale coming up Saturday, Oct. 3

Read More: British Columbians most worried about climate change nationally: poll



ruth.lloyd@wltribune.com

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