CCPL secretary, board member and tutor Claire Schreiner is available to help those with literacy needs. Angie Mindus photo

Cariboo Chilcotin Partners for Literacy can help you

Reach a Reader: Gaining literacy skills necessary for life

Workplace success involves acquiring and developing skills the Government says are essential to get ahead. Reading a variety of materials and documents with understanding is the first step. The ability to use numbers in money matters, data, scheduling and measuring comes next. Writing text and documents with understanding is vitally important.

The next skill involves clear spoken communication with co-workers, customers and others. In most jobs, a person needs to be able to work with others without problems. Many jobs require problem solving and decision making skills. The ability to use computers and other technologies is called regularly in daily situations especially for job searches and government forms. Last but not least, a person needs to be able to continue to learn for the job and to keep life interesting. (paraphrased from abclifeliteracy.ca)

Cariboo Chilcotin Partners for Literacy offers free help to people who may feel they lack some of these skills. From basic reading and writing to upgrading for advanced training, one-to-one trained tutors are available to help at our PAL office on Third Ave S. We offer services for new immigrants and refugees at our IMMS office on First Ave N. Free computer and technology sessions run every Thursday morning at the CRD Williams Lake Library, to book phone 250 392-3630. Help with understanding finances is another of our services, including filling out forms and applications and job searches. Programs for Seniors include writing life stories, financial literacy, using IPads, tablets and cell phones, and reading groups.

Learning begins at a very young age. CCPL provides services to help develop literacy in children. Books for Babies provides a bag of books for newborns and another book at the 18 month checkup. Bright Red Bookshelves offer free gently used children’s books at 16 public locations in Williams Lake. We set up Story Walk books at community events such as Children’s Festival and Strong Start parties. CCPL gives free children’s books at community events such as Family Fest and presents puppet shows and storytelling. Currently we have a grant for after school tutoring for a group of elementary students.

We always welcome new volunteers to help with our programs. For more information, visit our website at www.caribooliteracy.com or contact our Immigrant Services office at 778 412-9333, or our PAL office at 250 392-7833.

Claire has been with CCPL since its early days and has volunteered in many different roles in the organization. Claire is on the CCPL Board and is now the secretary.


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