Sage Birchwater rows on Nimpo Lake flew in to capture stories that are in the spring edition of British Columbia Magazine and for their new book.

Sage Birchwater rows on Nimpo Lake flew in to capture stories that are in the spring edition of British Columbia Magazine and for their new book.

B.C. Magazine features aerial view of Cariboo Chilcotin Coast and taste of book to come

There is an amazing article in British Columbia Magazine’s spring edition by lakecity writer Sage Birchwater and photographer Chris Harris.

There is an amazing article in British Columbia Magazine’s spring edition by lakecity writer Sage Birchwater and 105 Mile Ranch photographer Chris Harris.

The article is all about their adventures flying over the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast to produce a new book together about the aviation legacy of the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast called Fly Over British Columbia Cariboo Chilcotin Coast.

The article is called Flight Plan and documents some of the trips they made together to create the book that will be coming out in October.

Between June and October of last year Birchwater says he and Harris flew with six different pilots documenting what they saw by air in Harris’ photographs and Birchwater’s writings.

“We put a proposal in to B.C. Magazine back in August and we worked with the editor to put it together. It was really fun to work in the style that puts you in the pilot seat with the air blowing across your face.”

Shooting through the open door of a Cessna 172 aircraft or a float plane, several Beavers, and a helicopter the photographs in the article deliver a taste of what is to come in their book.

There are spectacular photographs of Ape Lake near the Monarch Icefields, white-rimmed islands in alkali lakes in the south Cariboo, the winding Dean River with the volcanic Anahim Peak in the distance, a panoramic view of the Cariboo Mountains above Isaac Lake, the muddy Fraser River running between range lands.

“As I fly with Chris I’m learning to see the landscape through the eyes of an artist,” Birchwater says in the article. “ Whether landing on an iceberg-strewn lake in the headwaters of the Talchako River or bird-dogging the flight of an Air Tractor 802 crop-duster plane at first light near Williams Lake, Chris is euphoric.”

By photographing the region from the air, he’s doing more than just documenting landscapes.

“From a plane there are unfamiliar perspectives and exciting discoveries,’” he says. “The possibilities are endless.”