B.C. Cowboy Hall of Fame showcases cowboys whio made a difference

British Columbia’s early history was carved out of the wilderness by thousands of hard working and often forgotten cowboys.

By Mark McMillan

British Columbia’s early history was carved out of the wilderness by thousands of hard working and often forgotten cowboys.

The BC Cowboy Hall of Fame was started by the BC Cowboy Heritage Society in 1998 to capture the memories of these living legends and share their stories.

The committee believes that induction into the Cowboy Hall of Fame is the only formal way to recognize and record into history the contributions of these “hard working and often forgotten cowboys.”

The committee limits Hall of Fame eligibility to actual working cowboys to help ensure the legends, both present and past, and their contributions to B.C.’s heritage will not be forgotten or overshadowed.

The criteria, in all of the following categories, are that the nominee must be, or have been, a professional working cowboy or rancher whose contributions have been made in B.C.

The categories are guidelines only and include:

Working Cowboy, Competitive Achievements, Ranching Pioneer, Horseman, Artistic Achievements, Family, and Century Ranch. Descriptions of these categories can be found on the website www.bcchs.com under “Hall of Fame.”

The 100 Mile House area was very much a part of B.C.’s beginnings, and ranching still plays an important role in the economic, social, and cultural life.

Some of the names of inductees in the 100 Mile area include Red Allison, Pat and Charlie Baker, the Cunningham family, Norman Granberg, Floyd Grinder, Danny Lytton, Maiden Creek Ranch, Harry Marriott, Wendell Monical, and Dick Threlkeld.

A full biography and photo of all the inductees can be found on the “Archives” page of the BC Cowboy Hall of Fame under www.bcchs.com.

Mark McMillan is the president of the BC Cowboy Heritage Society.