63rd annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale a resounding success

Horsefly 4-H Club member Riata Seelhof enters the ring to sell her Grand Champion steer, with the help of district 4-H president Ross Stafford, at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale Monday night at the Williams Lake Stockyards. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)(Angie Mindus photo)Horsefly 4-H Club member Riata Seelhof enters the ring to sell her Grand Champion steer, with the help of district 4-H president Ross Stafford, at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale Monday night at the Williams Lake Stockyards. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)(Angie Mindus photo)
Springhouse 4-H Club members Tyler Stanke and his cousin, Willa-Lyn Redl give a bath to a steer project Friday, Aug. 6 during the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale at the Williams Lake Stockyards. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Springhouse 4-H Club members Tyler Stanke and his cousin, Willa-Lyn Redl give a bath to a steer project Friday, Aug. 6 during the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale at the Williams Lake Stockyards. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Williams Lake First Nation 4-H Club member Kody Camille proudly shows off his black angus beef project, Big Chungus, at the Williams Lake Stockyards. Big Chungus, he said, was the biggest steer at the show. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Williams Lake First Nation 4-H Club member Kody Camille proudly shows off his black angus beef project, Big Chungus, at the Williams Lake Stockyards. Big Chungus, he said, was the biggest steer at the show. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Siblings Khloe Robbins (left) and Keane Philbrick, both members of the Williams Lake First Nation 4-H Club, get ready to wash their steer projects at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Siblings Khloe Robbins (left) and Keane Philbrick, both members of the Williams Lake First Nation 4-H Club, get ready to wash their steer projects at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Springhouse 4-H Club members Falynn Fraser (front to back), Taya Solomon, Elijah Walker and Glen Pollard man the swine pens Friday, Aug. 6 at the Williams Lake Stockyards. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Springhouse 4-H Club members Falynn Fraser (front to back), Taya Solomon, Elijah Walker and Glen Pollard man the swine pens Friday, Aug. 6 at the Williams Lake Stockyards. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Rose Lake/Miocene 4-H Club members Kimberly French (from left), Jessica Tritten and Trafce Van Immerzeel work stall duty. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Rose Lake/Miocene 4-H Club members Kimberly French (from left), Jessica Tritten and Trafce Van Immerzeel work stall duty. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Ashlynn Rutledge of the Highland 4-H Club and her swine project, Kevin Bacon. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Ashlynn Rutledge of the Highland 4-H Club and her swine project, Kevin Bacon. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Highland 4-H members Ashley Funke and Spruce, Denver Lytton and Sport, Sarah Tinney and Gregg and Daizey Sankey and Jasper, get ready to show their market lamb projects at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Highland 4-H members Ashley Funke and Spruce, Denver Lytton and Sport, Sarah Tinney and Gregg and Daizey Sankey and Jasper, get ready to show their market lamb projects at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Rose Lake/Miocene 4-H Club members Scarlett Johnston (from left), Zadie Van Imerzeel, Sarah Schoults and Jacob Shoults enjoy a game of cards to pass the time at the Williams Lake Stockyards during the weekend. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Rose Lake/Miocene 4-H Club members Scarlett Johnston (from left), Zadie Van Imerzeel, Sarah Schoults and Jacob Shoults enjoy a game of cards to pass the time at the Williams Lake Stockyards during the weekend. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Katy Jasper (from left), Sawyer Fuller and Sloan Fuller of the Williams Lake First Nation 4-H Club share some bonding time with some of the projects at the Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale Friday, Aug. 6. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Katy Jasper (from left), Sawyer Fuller and Sloan Fuller of the Williams Lake First Nation 4-H Club share some bonding time with some of the projects at the Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale Friday, Aug. 6. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale judge Davana Mahon (from left) inspects Canim Valley 4-H Club member Dakota Boyce’s market lamb project, while Jocelynn Johnson of the Rose Lake/Miocene 4-H Club looks on. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale judge Davana Mahon (from left) inspects Canim Valley 4-H Club member Dakota Boyce’s market lamb project, while Jocelynn Johnson of the Rose Lake/Miocene 4-H Club looks on. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
The 63rd annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale drew a crowd. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)The 63rd annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale drew a crowd. (Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Callie Gilbert works with her beef project at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Callie Gilbert works with her beef project at the 63rd Annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Lindsay Jorgensen (left), 2, visits Stefano the turkey and owner Juniper Rutledge at the 4-H show and sale Monday night. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Lindsay Jorgensen (left), 2, visits Stefano the turkey and owner Juniper Rutledge at the 4-H show and sale Monday night. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Samantha Kowalski of the Big Lake 4-H Club gives her market lamb Snowy a hug. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Samantha Kowalski of the Big Lake 4-H Club gives her market lamb Snowy a hug. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Horsefly 4-H Club member Renée Seelhoff heads to the sale ring with her beef project Monday evening, Aug. 9. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Horsefly 4-H Club member Renée Seelhoff heads to the sale ring with her beef project Monday evening, Aug. 9. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Karisa Fraser sells her beef project during the 63rd annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)Karisa Fraser sells her beef project during the 63rd annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
In all, there were 69 beef projects up for grabs at the 4-H show and sale. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)In all, there were 69 beef projects up for grabs at the 4-H show and sale. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
4-H market lamb judge Davana Mahon awards Chimney Valley 4-H Club member Ashtynn Cullum and Buddy grand champion market lamb. (Photo submitted)4-H market lamb judge Davana Mahon awards Chimney Valley 4-H Club member Ashtynn Cullum and Buddy grand champion market lamb. (Photo submitted)

4-H club members aged eight to 19 generated more than $500,000 in sales during the 63rd annual Williams Lake and District 4-H Show and Sale.

“The support the kids get from the Williams Lake and 100 Mile House area is phenomenal, year after year,” said district president Ross Stafford, one of several parent volunteers who worked late Monday evening (Aug. 9) to ensure another successful sale. “We see continued supporters and we’re seeing new faces too coming in and supporting these kids. It’s really good to see. Without them, we wouldn’t have the great program that we have for the members.”

The sale, held at the Williams Lake Stockyards, successfully wrapped up a weekend in which club members from Big Lake, Horsefly, Rose Lake/Miocene, Springhouse, Chimney Valley, Williams Lake First Nation, Canim Valley, Lone Butte, Highland, Boston Bar and Lillooet, showed off their projects following months of hard work.

About 150 projects, ranging from beef, swine, lamb and turkeys to foods and small engine projects, were up for bid with 4-H supporters showing their approval for the program with highly generous offers. Highlights included $1,700 for three cheesecakes and a bidder purchasing a market lamb and then returning it to its club member. A rabbit was also bought two times with the second sale earnings going into the general club revenue.

“It all helps keep the program going,” Ross said.

The show featured 69 beef projects selling at $4.50 per pound on average, 43 swine projects netting about $5 per pound on average, 27 market lambs averaging $9.50 per pound, and three, 30-pound turkeys which garnered a whopping $30 per pound on average. Small engine projects included a dirt bike and even a boat.

“It’s a great learning program for the kids,” Stafford said, adding that throughout the year club members hone their skills in everything from public speaking to learning how to raise a healthy animal.

“I’ve seen a lot of kids where they’ve been really shy and just stick with their parents, and by the time the 4-H program is done, they can stand up in front of a group of two or 300 people and do a speech or a presentation and not even bat an eye. It’s nice to see.”

Ross noted the local 4-H district, which is the largest in the province, has seen its share of challenges in the last five years.

“Fires and COVID has been extremely challenging for the whole district, basically for the whole 4-H program. Everybody had to adapt to a whole new way of doing things. We went from having monthly club meetings face-to-face to having Zoom meetings over the computers.”

Husbandry checks and judging rallies were done over Facetime, he added, noting it was a big learning curve for everyone but all the hard work and sacrifice put in over the year paid off in the end.

“It’s a lot of work but it’s worth it for the kids. That’s what we’re here for, we’re here for the kids. I wouldn’t give 4-H up for anything.”


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