Chimney Valley 4-H Club member Kevin Sokolan will be at the 4-H Show and Sale this coming week with his steer Tyrone. The show starts Saturday and winds up with the sale on Wednesday evening at the Williams Lake Stockyards.

4-H sale provides great local produce

If you are looking for gently raised, home grown produce for your freezer this winter look no further than the 4-H Show and Sale.

If you are looking for gently raised, home grown produce for your freezer this winter look no further than the 56th annual 4-H Show and Sale beginning this weekend and wrapping up with the sale of projects on Wednesday evening.

There will be all kinds of opportunities at the Williams Lake Stockyards to view the animals being sold during the showing and judging of projects prior to the sale.

The actual sale night Wednesday, Aug. 20 starts with the parade of champions at 5:30 p.m. followed by opening ceremonies and the sale starting at 6:30 p.m. in the show ring.

4-H celebrates 100 years in B.C. this year so this show and sale will be a little extra special for the approximately 170 4-H members in the Williams Lake District.

Since 1914, 4-H has been teaching youth to use their Head, Heart, Hands and Health to develop their leadership skills, ability to work as a team and boost their overall confidence, says district key leader Fred Stafford, who invites the public to come and see what they have been doing all year.

“We welcome you to discover the program that is “more than you ever imagined” this week by attending the 56th Annual 4-H Show and Sale,” Stafford says.

Between Saturday and sale night next Wednesday 4-H members from Big Lake, Horsefly, Rose Lake/Miocene, Springhouse, Chimney Valley, Canim Valley, Lone Butte, and Clinton will be giving interesting demonstrations for both potential buyers and families of all the things they have been “learning by doing” as their motto states.

4-H members will be showing beef, pigs, sheep, rabbits, poultry and other small animals, many of which will be for sale. They will also be demonstrating other projects such as work they have been doing in gardening, working with small engines, photography, foods, horses and much more.

Activities begin with the horse show demonstrations at 9  a.m. on Saturday morning, Aug. 16.

The beef weigh-in happens from noon to 1:30 p.m. followed by the small animal weigh-in and photo measuring from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. and the oral and written judging of projects starting at 3 p.m.

Sunday the day begins at 9 a.m. with photography pre-judging and the market lamb classes.

Cloverbuds — the youngest 4-Hers will show their projects at 1 p.m. The rabbit show begins at 1:30 p.m. followed by the poultry show at 2 p.m.; photography showmanship from 2:30 to 5 p.m. and showing of the heifer classes at 6 p.m.

Monday the day starts with foods demonstrations at 8:30 a.m.; gardening demonstrations at 9:30 a.m. and beef weight classes at 10 a.m.

Beef projects will fill out activities in the afternoon, with beef senior showmanship starting at 1 p.m.; groups of four steers shown at 3:30 p.m.; best groomed calf at 6 p.m.; grand champion steer at 7 p.m.

Tuesday starts off with the small engine projects and a tractor demonstration at 9 a.m. followed by the most enthusiastic Sharon Anderson Memorial award at 10 a.m.

The rest of the day is dedicated to swine projects with swine showmanship starting at 10:30 a.m.; best groomed swine at 1 p.m. and swine weight classes starting at 2 p.m.

The 4-Hers will be involved in lots of cleanup along the way but organizers have also scheduled in some fun for them.

Saturday evening the club presidents and leaders meet. Sunday night all the members can enjoy a swim at Sam Ketcham Memorial Pool. Monday night is games night and Tuesday night there will be a dance for members.

Stafford notes 4-H also provides youth with opportunities beyond their home communities as well, through camps, provincial level competitions, national award trips, and scholarship programs.

“These opportunities would not be possible without the numerous volunteer leaders, parents, and a supportive community like Williams Lake and surrounding area,” Stafford says in his welcome address in the 4-H flyer being distributed throughout the community this week by the Tribune/Weekend Advisor.

“Your generous support over the years has helped to give hundreds of kids a program that teaches them to strive for excellence and achieve lifelong goals through the motto ‘Learn to Do by Doing.’”

 

 

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